benefits
UPGRADE YOUR SKILLS

THE LEARNING CURVE

01 Course Pre-requisites

To attend, you must hold ITIL® 4 Foundation certification.

Show More

02 Course Overview

What's Included

  • ITIL® 4 Specialist High Velocity IT Training Manual
  • 3 days of instructor-led tuition
  • Certificate
  • Exam
Show More

03 What will the delegates learn ?

You will learn the following main ITIL 4 practices:

  • Architecture management
  • Business analysis
  • Deployment management
  • Service validation and testing
  • Software development and management
Show More

04 Course Content

The syllabus of the ITIL 4 Specialist High Velocity IT (HVIT) certificate training courseware consists of:

1. Understand concepts regarding the high-velocity nature of the digital enterprise, including the demand it places on IT

1.1 Understand the following terms:

  • Digital organisation
  • High-velocity IT
  • Digital transformation
  • IT transformation
  • Digital product
  • Digital technology

1.2 Understand when the transformation to high-velocity IT is desirable and feasible

1.3 Understand the five objectives associated with digital products to achieve:

  • Valuable investments – strategically innovative and effective application of IT
  • Fast development - quick realisation and delivery of IT services and IT-related products
  • Resilient operations - highly resilient IT services and IT-related products
  • Co-created value - effective interactions between service provider and consumer
  • Assured conformance - to governance, risk and compliance (GRC) requirements

2. Understand the digital product lifecycle in terms of the ITIL ‘operating model’

2.1 Understand how high-velocity IT relates to:

  • The four dimensions of service management
  • The ITIL service value system
  • The service value chain
  • The digital product lifecycle

3. Understand the importance of the ITIL guiding principles and other fundamental concepts for delivering high-velocity IT

3.1 Understand the following principles, models and concepts:

  • Ethics
  • Safety culture
  • Lean culture
  • Toyota Kata
  • Lean / Agile / resilient / continuous
  • Service-dominant logic
  • Design thinking
  • Complexity thinking

3.2 Know how to use the following principles, models and concepts:

  • Ethics
  • Safety culture
  • Lean culture
  • Toyota Kata
  • Lean / Agile / resilient / continuous
  • Service-dominant logic
  • Design thinking
  • Complexity thinking
  • How the above contribute to:
  • Help get customers’ jobs done
  • Trust and be trusted
  • Continually raise the bar
  • Accept ambiguity and uncertainty
  • Commit to continual learning

4. Know how to contribute to achieving value with digital products

4.1 Know how the service provider ensures valuable investments are achieved.

4.2 Know how to use the following practices to contribute to achieving valuable investments

  • Portfolio management
  • Relationship management

4.3 Know how the service provider ensures fast development is achieved.

4.4 Know how to use the following practices to contribute to achieving fast development

  • Architecture management
  • Business analysis
  • Deployment management
  • Service validation and testing
  • Software development and management

4.5 Know how the service provider ensures resilient operations are achieved.

4.6 Know how to use the following practices to contribute to achieving resilient operations

  • Availability management
  • Capacity and performance management
  • Monitoring and event management
  • Problem management
  • Service continuity management
  • Infrastructure and platform management

4.7 Know how the service provider ensures co-created value is achieved.

4.8 Know how to use the following practices to contribute to achieving co-created value with the service consumer

  • Relationship management
  • Service design
  • Service desk

4.9 Know how the service provider ensures assured conformance is achieved

4.10 Know how to use the following practices to contribute to achieving assured conformance

  • Information security management
  • Risk management
Show More
COURSE EVENTS, LOCATIONS & PRICES

THE SCHEDULES

Search for more related course schedules

Course Name Dates Duration Price Book Online
ITIL® 4 Specialist: High Velocity IT Training 04/01/2022 Luton
2 days
£4394
ITIL® 4 Specialist: High Velocity IT Training 13/04/2022 Luton
2 days
£4394
ITIL® 4 Specialist: High Velocity IT Training 19/04/2022 Luton
2 days
£4394
ITIL® 4 Specialist: High Velocity IT Training 03/05/2022 Luton
2 days
£4394
ITIL® 4 Specialist: High Velocity IT Training 01/06/2022 Luton
2 days
£4394
ITIL® 4 Specialist: High Velocity IT Training 03/06/2022 Luton
2 days
£4394
ITIL® 4 Specialist: High Velocity IT Training 30/08/2022 Luton
2 days
£4394
ITIL® 4 Specialist: High Velocity IT Training 27/12/2022 Luton
2 days
£4394
ITIL® 4 Specialist: High Velocity IT Training 29/12/2022 Luton
2 days
£4394
Show entries

About Luton

Luton

Luton is a large town located in Bedfordshire, England. Luton is 14 miles west of Stevenage, 30 miles north-west of London, 20 miles east of Aylesbury and 22 miles south-east of Milton Keynes. In 1938 London Luton Airport was opened which is one of the Britain’s major airports. Luton has two League team namely Luton Town Football Club, its history includes various spells in the top flight of Football League Cup triumph as well as English league in 1988. 

Luton was known for Hat Making, and it also had large Vauxhall Motors Factory. In 1905 Car Production started at the plant, and it continued until 2002.  Largest one-day carnival in Europe namely Luton Carnival is held on the Whitsun May Bank Holiday.

History

During the 20th century, hat making industry which flourished for so long ultimately declined because new industries came into Luton. One of them was engineering. In 1905 Vauxhall came to town. Very soon Luton was known for car manufacturing. At the beginning of 20th-century gas cookers, meters, as well as ball bearings, were made in Luton. During the beginning of the twentieth-century chemical industries also started in Luton. During the end of 1930s Luton was a developing town and had less unemployment than other city and this is due to new industries. In the 20th century, Luton grew rapidly. In 1914 this town had a population of 50000, and by 1960s this population grew to over 130,000.

In the 20th century, conditions in Luton improved. Trams started running in streets of Luton in 1908. In 1920s trams were replaced by buses. In 1909 first cinema in Luton was opened. In 1938 Luton airport was opened. Council bought a Wardown estate in 1904 and made its park. In 1931 Wardown house became museum and art gallery. Town hall was burned down during a riot in 1919. New Town Hall was constructed in 1936. During the 1920s and 1930s Council started demolishing worst slums in Luton and they constructed first council houses.In 1937 New Court House was built.

In 1928 and 1933 boundaries of Luton was expanded to include Stopsley, Limbury and Leagrave. In 1939 Luton and Dunstable hospital was opened. During Second World War Luton was bombed. Around 107 people were killed due to German bombing, and over 1500 were damaged. After the end of the war, Luton Council replaced damaged houses by constructing new homes. At Farley Hill, Limbury, Stopsley and Leagrave, Estates were built. In 1962 New Central Library was built in Luton and in 1972 Arndale Centre has been constructed. Luton was made unitary authority in 1997, and Galaxy Leisure Complex was opened in 1998. The new railway station and Luton Airport Parkway was built in 1999. In 2002 Car Production ended in Luton. St Georges Square was reconstructed in 2007. Now the population of Luton is 255,000.

Show More
Locations Availability

ITIL® 4 Specialist: High Velocity IT Training Availability

Cookie Policy - To give you the best possible experience, this site uses cookies. Continuing to use this site means that you agree to our use of cookies.  Okay, I accept